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Study: More than half of breastfeeding mothers don’t have access to basic workplace accommodations

Tuesday, October 13, 2015

A new study from the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota finds that fewer than half of breastfeeding mothers who return to work after giving birth reported having  access to basic accommodations of time and space to express breastmilk at work.  Specifically, the researchers found that only 40 percent of new mothers who were breastfeeding their babies had access to both adequate break time and private space, which was not a bathroom, at their workplace.

However, those mothers who did have access to workplace accommodations were more than twice as likely as those without these accommodations to exclusively breastfeed their baby for 6 months, as recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

The study findings were published today in Women’s Health Issues.

Study: Limb compression device can reduce the annual occurrence of skin infections in lymphedema patients by nearly 80 percent

Wednesday, October 7, 2015

Media note: Watch study authors Alan T. Hirsch, M.D., and Pinar Karaca-Mandic, Ph.D., discuss their study findings here.

A new landmark national study published today in JAMA Dermatology found the use of an advanced pneumatic compression device (APCD) reduced the episodes  of skin infections that occur annually in patients with lymphedema by nearly 80 percent. Rates of cellulitis, the medical term for such skin infections, were lowered from 21 percent to 4.5 percent in the individuals with lymphedema due to cancer, and from 28.8 percent to 7.3 percent in individuals whose lymphedema was not due to cancer.

The research was conducted at the University of Minnesota Medical School and School of Public Health in collaboration with Vanderbilt University School of Nursing and Stanford University School of Medicine.

Study: The High Cost of Inaction: Continued tobacco use accelerates cardiovascular risk factors for people with peripheral artery disease

Monday, September 28, 2015

“Like adding gasoline to a fire.” This is how investigators from the University of Minnesota Medical School’s Cardiovascular Division describe the effect of continued tobacco use on the number of heart attacks, serious leg artery blockages, strokes, and aneurysms in people with peripheral artery disease (PAD). The new major research study was published online today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology

The study analyzed 2011 claims data of more than 22,000 people with PAD, and was the first to define the associated immediate health and economic burden of tobacco use in Minnesota and the United States. Claims data used in the study were provided by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota, the state’s largest health plan.

Study: Lesbian, gay, and bisexual adults more likely to anticipate future long-term care needs

Thursday, September 17, 2015

A new study shows that lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) adults were more likely than their heterosexual counterparts to believe they’d need long-term care in the future. The research was conducted at the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota.

The findings were published online today in the American Journal of Public Health.

This study follows a January 2015 study in Health Affairs, which found middle-aged adult Americans (ages 40-65) underestimate their future health care needs for long-term care services and supports. The Health Affairs study found 60 percent think they are unlikely to need care, while in reality only 30 percent will not need care.

Study: High body satisfaction among overweight girls associated with less weight gain over time

Tuesday, September 15, 2015

A new study from the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota suggests high body satisfaction among overweight adolescents was not harmful in terms of weight control over a 10-year period. Furthermore, high body satisfaction among overweight girls was associated with less weight gain over time compared to girls with very low body satisfaction.

The findings, which were published today in the Journal of Adolescent Health, utilized data from 496 participants of Project EAT (Eating and Activity Among Teens), a 10-year longitudinal study developed to examine eating, activity, and weight-related factors among young people.

Study: Incentive-based employer wellness programs effective, but demonstrate diminishing effects

Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Media note: Watch study author Jean Abraham, Ph.D., discuss her study findings here.

New research from the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota finds incentive-based employer wellness programs were effective in promoting fitness center attendance among participants, but that its impact begins to diminish after their first year in the program. 

The findings were published today in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

“Incentive-based programs that encourage employees to go to the gym are a popular type of wellness program offered by many large employers today,” said Jean Abraham, Ph.D., lead author and associate professor of health policy and management in the University of Minnesota School of Public Health. “In this study, we sought to understand what happens over time with respect to employees’ fitness center attendance.”  

University of Minnesota receives $2.4 million from Richard M. Schulze Family Foundation to create skin for human patients

Thursday, August 27, 2015

The University of Minnesota has been awarded $2.4 million from the Richard M. Schulze Family Foundation for research aimed at creating new skin for use in patients.

Among its many applications, the skin would be used to treat burns, repair congenital defects, heal injuries caused by accidents or sustained in combat and reconstruct skin damaged by cancer therapies.  

UMN cancer researcher named National Cancer Institute Outstanding Investigator

Thursday, August 13, 2015

Jeffrey Miller, M.D., deputy director of the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, has been awarded over $6 million by the National Cancer Institute’s Outstanding Investigator program.  The  selection process is highly competitive and Miller is one of fewer than 50 this fiscal year to receive the award - and the only in Minnesota. 

The award is designed to give outstanding researchers the freedom to take more risks, to be more adventurous in their line of inquiry, and to provide a sufficient amount of time to develop new techniques by providing seven years of financial support.

State-level prior approval authority over health insurance rates in the individual market from 2010 to 2013 was associated with a 10 percentage point lower rate of increase in premiums

Monday, August 3, 2015

 A new study published today  found state-level prior approval authority over individual market health insurance rates were in effect from 2010 to 2013 was associated a 10 percentage point lower rate of increase in premiums.

The research was published in the August issue ofHealth Affairs, and was conducted at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health in collaboration with the University of California, Berkeley School of Public Health.

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