Health Care Reform

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Health care reform impact illustration

At the University of Minnesota, our health policy experts partner with clinical providers from across the health sciences to develop the research that state and national legislative leaders need to effectively guide health reform efforts. We also analyze and study health reform policies already underway in our country to determine where policy changes could make efforts even more effective. 

The University of Minnesota's health sciences are committed to reforming health care systems to provide efficient and effective care for everyone in our state and beyond.

Informing health care policy

In an evolving political landscape, health care reform efforts can’t succeed without a strong foundation of policy research. Our experts can analyze massive amounts of health data and draw the connections necessary for effective laws and new policy direction.

Shaping policy

Learn more about how our experts’ research lays the groundwork to shape the health care landscape.

Jean Abraham, Ph.D. of the University of Minnesota's School of Public Health studied the impact of the implementation of the Affordable Care Act on employer-sponsored health insurance. 

Reduced health care spending burdens for young adults

Ezra Golberstein, Ph.D., professor in the Division of Health Policy and Management at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, in collaboration with researchers from Yale University and Dartmouth College, found the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) provision allowing young adults to stay on their parents’ insurance plans until they turn 26, was associated with significant reductions in the likelihood that young adults had to pay high out-of-pocket costs for health care.

Decreased number of Minnesotans without insurance

The State Health Access Data Assistance Center (SHADAC) at the University of Minnesota prepared a report which found that the number of Minnesotans without health insurance fell by 40.6 percent between September 30, 2013 and May 1, 2014, after the implementation of the Affordable Care Act.